Political Trends

Putin ‘Very Sick’ With Cancer, Other Health Issues: Ukrainian Official

He added that the fighting in Ukraine will be finished by the end of the year, and Russia's defeat in Ukraine "will eventually lead to the change of leadership of the Russian Federation. This process has already been launched and they are moving into that way."

Putin ‘Very Sick’ With Cancer, Other Health Issues: Ukrainian Official

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Emma Mayer – 4h ago

AUkrainian official divulged that Russian President Vladimir Putin is “very sick” with cancer and other illnesses, the latest assertion as rumors have swirled regarding Putin’s health.

Speculations that Putin is ill have floated around since the start of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February, as many have been quick to point out instances where the Russian strongman looked pale or sickly.

Most recently, Ukraine’s head of military intelligence, Major General Kyrylo Budanov, told Sky News that Putin was in a “very bad psychological and physical condition and he is very sick.”

He added that Putin has “cancer and other illnesses,” and when Sky News asked if he was merely spreading propaganda, Budanov replied, “It’s my job, it’s my work, if not me, who will know this?”

The Kremlin has continuously insisted that Putin is in good health, and Newsweek could not independently verify these claims.

Budanov added in his interview that Russia has “suffered heavy losses in manpower and armour and I can say that when the artillery strikes happened, many of the crews abandoned their equipment.”

He added that the fighting in Ukraine will be finished by the end of the year, and Russia’s defeat in Ukraine “will eventually lead to the change of leadership of the Russian Federation. This process has already been launched and they are moving into that way.”

On Wednesday, Putin’s absence from an ice hockey game in which he usually plays fueled more speculation that he is unwell, as he gave a video address to players and attendees instead. And last week, a claim about the Russian president was made on Telegram, saying he was preparing to undergo cancer surgery.

This is not the first suspicion that Putin has undergone surgery, and the Kremlin has previously denied that Putin had surgery related to thyroid cancer, online outlet The Moscow Times reported on April 1.

Theresa Fallon, founder and director of the Centre for Russia Europe Asia Studies (CREAS) in Brussels, told The Independent, “[Mr Putin] has always tried to emphasize his fitness and vigor, which is part of his brand. Illness does not fit with Putin’s strong man narrative that has been carefully cultivated over the years by the Kremlin. This makes me wonder if there is really something else going on behind the scenes.”

However, as the speculation continues, some believe that instances of Putin looking shaky or ill are only theatrics. Olga Lautmann, a senior fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis, told Newsweek in an earlier report, “I think that Putin coming out and exhibiting symptoms of sickness was more theatrics and distraction. If Putin was really ill, he wouldn’t want people surrounding him to know.”

Concerns for Putin’s health came most recently after his appearance at the Victory Day parade on May 9, in which he had his legs covered with a blanket and seemed to hold onto the podium tightly when giving an address.

Ad 00:08 – Up Next “Video Of Putin Gripping Table And Slouching Sparks Health Questions”
 
 
Video Of Putin Gripping Table And Slouching Sparks Health Questions

Newsweek reached out to the Russian Defense Ministry and the Kremlin for comment.

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Historic’: Pentagon spokesperson hails Finland’s move toward NATO membership

“NATO membership would strengthen Finland’s security. As a member of NATO, Finland would strengthen the entire defence alliance,” the Finnish leaders said in a joint statement. “Finland must apply for NATO membership without delay. We hope that the national steps still needed to make this decision will be taken rapidly within the next few days.”

‘Historic’: Pentagon spokesperson hails Finland’s move toward NATO membership

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By Quint Forgey – 34m ago
 

Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby on Thursday praised Finland’s move towards NATO membership and credited Russian President Vladimir Putin with inadvertently strengthening the Western military alliance amid Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine.

“It’s historic — there’s no question about that — for Finland, but also potentially for NATO here,” Kirby told MSNBC. “Mr. Putin, one of the things he said he didn’t want was a strong NATO on his Western flank, and he’s getting that.”

Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, which has dragged on now for 11 weeks, has resulted in NATO “actually growing in strength,” Kirby said. “It’s growing in deterrence capability. And, look, I won’t get ahead of the alliance and Finland’s accession, but if they join it, that’s another nation here.”

Kirby’s remarks came after Finland’s President Sauli Niinistö and Prime Minister Sanna Marin on Thursday officially endorsed the proposal for their country’s NATO membership.

“NATO membership would strengthen Finland’s security. As a member of NATO, Finland would strengthen the entire defence alliance,” the Finnish leaders said in a joint statement. “Finland must apply for NATO membership without delay. We hope that the national steps still needed to make this decision will be taken rapidly within the next few days.”

In addition to Finland, Sweden’s leaders also are expected to announce support for their own country’s NATO membership in the coming days. The two countries may submit their membership bids together, perhaps as soon as Monday, ahead of Niinistö’s scheduled trip to Sweden next Tuesday.

On Thursday, Kirby described Finland’s and Sweden’s armed forces as “modern militaries” with “terrific capabilities,” adding: “They may be small, but they are powerful.”

“They’re already sort of using NATO-standard kind of equipment and systems,” Kirby said. “And so integrating them into the alliance would not be very difficult at all. In fact, I mean, we routinely operate and train with the Finns and with the Swedes. So interoperability is just not going to be an issue.”

China rebukes U.S. for changing Taiwan wording on State Department website

BEIJING (Reuters) -China's Foreign Ministry on Tuesday slammed the United States for changing the wording on the State Department website about Taiwan, saying "political manipulation" will not succeed in changing the status quo over the island.

China rebukes U.S. for changing Taiwan wording on State Department website

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FILE PHOTO: Taiwan flags can be seen at a square ahead of the national day celebration in Taoyuan
 
 
·3 min read
 
 

BEIJING (Reuters) -China’s Foreign Ministry on Tuesday slammed the United States for changing the wording on the State Department website about Taiwan, saying “political manipulation” will not succeed in changing the status quo over the island.

The State Department website’s section on relations with Taiwan has removed wording on not supporting Taiwan independence and on acknowledging Beijing’s position that Taiwan is part of China.

Washington said the update did not reflect a change in policy.

China’s government considers the democratically ruled island to be inviolable Chinese territory.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told reporters there is only one China, Taiwan belongs to China and that the People’s Republic of China is the sole legal government representing the whole country.

Taiwan rejects Beijing’s sovereignty claims, saying only the island’s 23 million people can decide their future.

The United States’ changing of its fact sheet on Taiwan-U.S ties is “a petty act of fictionalising and hollowing out the one-China principle,” he added.

“This kind of political manipulation on the Taiwan question is an attempt to change the status quo in the Taiwan Strait, and will inevitably stir up a fire that only burns” the United States, Zhao said.

State Department spokesperson Ned Price said that while some wording may have changed, “our underlying policy has not changed.”

“We regularly do updates on our fact sheets. Our fact sheets reflect, in the case of Taiwan, our rock-solid unofficial relationship with Taiwan, and we call upon the PRC to behave responsibly and to not manufacture pretences to increase pressure on Taiwan,” Price said in a press briefing, referring to the People’s Republic of China.

The wording change appears to have happened on May 5, the date at the top of the fact sheet, but it was only widely noticed in Chinese and Taiwanese media on Tuesday.

The State Department also added wording on the Six Assurances, referring to six Reagan-era security assurances given to Taiwan, which the United States declassified in 2020.

U.S. President Joe Biden said in November the United States was not encouraging independence for Taiwan, having caused a stir in October when he said it would come to the island’s defence if China attacked.

The latter remark appeared to depart from Washington’s long-held policy of “strategic ambiguity” – not making clear how the United States would respond – though the White House quickly said Biden was not signalling a change in policy.

U.S. intelligence chiefs told a congressional hearing on Tuesday that China would prefer to take over Taiwan without military action but was working to get to a position where its military could prevail even if the United States intervenes.

Taiwan’s Foreign Ministry said the island will continue to strengthen its defence capabilities and cooperate with the United States and other like-minded countries to promote peace, stability and prosperity.

(Reporting by Eduardo Baptista; additional reporting by Daphne Psaledakis, Simon Lewis and David Brunnstrom in Washington; Writing and additional reporting by Ben Blanchard in Taipei; Editing by Jacqueline Wong, Cynthia Osterman and Sandra Maler)

U.S. math professor found guilty in latest China Initiative trial

A federal jury in Illinois decided yesterday that an applied math professor at Southern Illinois University (SIU), Carbondale, did not commit grant fraud but is guilty of failing to report a bank account in China on his U.S. tax returns.

U.S. math professor found guilty in latest China Initiative trial

Mingqing Xiao convicted on tax charges, but found not guilty of grant fraud

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Mingqing Xiao convicted on tax charges, but found not guilty of grant fraud
Mingqing Xiao before his trial

A federal jury in Illinois decided yesterday that an applied math professor at Southern Illinois University (SIU), Carbondale, did not commit grant fraud but is guilty of failing to report a bank account in China on his U.S. tax returns.

Minqqing Xiao’s was the fourth case to go to a jury resulting from the China Initiative, a controversial U.S. law enforcement campaign that has led to the prosecution of some two dozen U.S. academics, most of them of Chinese ancestry. Launched in 2018, the U.S. Department of Justice recently relabeled the initiative as a “strategy for countering nation-state threat” after concluding that its previous name had had a “chilling effect on U.S.-based scientists of Chinese origin” and “fueled a narrative of intolerance and bias.”

In the three previous jury cases, a federal judge acquitted University of Tennessee, Knoxville, mechanical engineer Anming Hu of all charges after the jury deadlocked; Harvard University biochemist Charles Lieber was convicted of failing to disclose his research ties to China; and University of Kansas, Lawrence, chemist Franklin Tao was convicted on similar charges. None had been charged with any inappropriate sharing of research results with Chinese counterparts.

Xiao, a tenured SIU professor and U.S. citizen, was indicted in April 2021 and charged with three counts of fraud. Prosecutors alleged he lied to the National Science Foundation (NSF) and his university about ties to Shenzhen University and Chinese research funding agencies in connection with a 2019 NSF grant he received. Last fall, the government added four counts of violating tax laws by failing to report to U.S. authorities a Chinese bank account created to support his research collaborations in China.

However, on Monday District Judge Staci Yandle threw out two of the fraud charges. And yesterday the jury took just 3 hours to acquit Xiao on the third fraud count.

At the same time, however, the jury convicted Xiao on the four tax charges. It agreed with the prosecution’s contention that Xiao had failed to disclose the bank account in China on his federal income tax returns and had not filed the necessary documents with the Department of the Treasury. Xiao’s attorneys said they plan to appeal the verdict, which could result in a prison sentence of up to 5 years and a substantial fine.

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The judge’s decision to dismiss two of the fraud counts, and Xiao’s acquittal on the third, represents “a complete rebuke of the Department of Justice’s China Initiative,” said his lawyers, Ryan Poscablo, Patrick Linehan, and Michelle Nasser, in a statement. “We are thankful that those counts were rejected by the Court and the jury as we believe that they were unjust, improperly motivated, and unsupported by the facts and the law.”

The U.S. attorney’s office that prosecuted the case had no immediate comment on the verdict.

SIU faculty and friends of Xiao had mounted a vigorous show of support throughout the 2-week trial. More than two dozen made the daily trek to the small town of Benton, Illinois, some 55 kilometers from the SIU campus in Carbondale, wearing buttons that proclaimed “I stand with Ming” as they sat in the courtroom.

“It’s a massive victory for Ming,” says Ed Benyas, an SIU music professor who helped organize the daily vigils. “The government was not able to prove that Ming did anything wrong in applying for his federal grant.”

Xiao remains on paid administrative leave from the university, which launched an investigation after his indictment. “Any discipline will be in accordance with the collective bargaining agreement between SIU and the SIU Faculty Association,” says a university spokesperson. “That agreement includes opportunities for Dr. Xiao to respond to any allegations.”

Xiao remains under court supervision prior to his sentencing, which is scheduled for 11 August. He also faces staggering legal fees, Benyas says, noting that a GoFundMe account has raised barely 10% of its $350,000 goal.

China: Zhoushan’s sky turns blood-red, triggering panic in port city

Residents in China’s port city of Zhoushan were left stunned as the skies above them briefly turned blood-red over the weekend, sparking fears of a possible fire or an unknown phenomenon.

China: Zhoushan’s sky turns blood-red, triggering panic in port city

 
·1 min read

Residents in China’s port city of Zhoushan were left stunned as the skies above them briefly turned blood-red over the weekend, sparking fears of a possible fire or an unknown phenomenon.

However, panic was quickly quelled when meteorological experts concluded that the colour came from lights refracted from local boats in low clouds in the region.

Officials in the area also confirmed that no fire was reported in the city around the time skies turned red.

The red sky became one of the top trending topics on Chinese social media with more than 150 million views.

Vladimir Putin to hand over power to loyalist Patrushev as he faces cancer surgery: Reports

Russian President Vladimir Putin will reportedly hand over power to the secretary of the country's Security Council Nikolai Patrushev temporarily as he faces surgery over cancer fears.

Vladimir Putin to hand over power to loyalist Patrushev as he faces cancer surgery: Reports

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Russian President Vladimir Putin may disappear for a while as he faces surgery over cancer fear (AP)
Russian President Vladimir Putin may disappear for a while as he faces surgery over cancer fear (AP)

  • An unverified Russian channel on the Telegram app has claimed that doctors have told President Vladimir Putin that he will have to undergo surgery. 
  • The anticipated surgery and recovery are expected to incapacitate Putin for ‘a short time’
 
 

Russian President Vladimir Putin will reportedly hand over power to the secretary of the country’s Security Council Nikolai Patrushev temporarily as he faces surgery over cancer fears.

An unverified Russian channel on the Telegram app has claimed that doctors have told Putin that he will have to undergo surgery. The anticipated surgery and recovery are expected to incapacitate Putin for “a short time,” the report said.

 

The General SVR Telegram channel had first raised the issue of Putin’s health-including abdominal cancer and Parkinson’s some 18 months ago.

It is suggested that 69-year-old Putin has already delayed surgery. The surgery had been scheduled for the second half of April but was delayed.

Referring to Putin’s supposedly “sickly appearance and uncharacteristically fidgety behaviour in public” in recent times, the report said that the Russian President has been rumoured to suffer from cancer and a host of other serious maladies, including Parkinson’s disease.

However, a US official said that the media reports could not be verified with Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby saying on Monday that “I have seen nothing that could help us corroborate that,” New York Post reported.

About Nikolai Patrushev:

As per the Telegram channel, Patrushev is an ‘outright villain’, and ‘he is a more cunning and insidious person than Vladimir Putin’. The owner of the Telegram channel has claimed that if Patrishev will come to power, it will only multiply Russia’s problem.

 

Like Putin, Patrushev is a career Russian intelligence agent, first with the Soviet KGB, then later with the Russian FSB.

However, Putin is unlikely to agree to hand over power for a longer period. The Telegram channel claimed that the control of the country will likely be in Patrushev’s hands for no more than two to three days.

China’s low Covid death toll prompts questions

Two years into the pandemic, China's resurgent Covid-19 outbreak has revived questions about how the country counts deaths from the virus, with persistently low fatalities despite rising cases.

China’s low Covid death toll prompts questions

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Shanghai, China’s largest city, has logged 138 deaths among over half a million infections in nearly two months (AFP/LIU JIN) (LIU JIN)

Two years into the pandemic, China’s resurgent Covid-19 outbreak has revived questions about how the country counts deaths from the virus, with persistently low fatalities despite rising cases.

Shanghai, China’s largest city, has logged 190 deaths among more than 520,000 infections in nearly two months — a fraction of the rate in outbreaks fuelled by the Omicron variant in other parts of the world.

The figures have been trumpeted by the ruling Communist Party as proof its strict zero-Covid pandemic approach works, but experts say the data alone does not tell the whole story.

– How does China’s toll compare? –

 

Shanghai, the hardest-hit city in China’s current coronavirus wave, has logged a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.036 percent — 36 deaths per 100,000 people infected since March 1.

China had wrestled domestic infections down to a trickle before the latest outbreak but, even so, the death toll is low compared with other countries lauded as Covid-19 success stories.

“If Shanghai had a similar CFR to New Zealand — 0.07 percent in its current Omicron outbreak — then it would have seen more than 300 deaths,” Michael Baker, professor of public health at the University of Otago in New Zealand, told AFP.

China has recorded fewer than 5,000 deaths from Covid-19, despite logging nearly 200,000 symptomatic cases and more than 470,000 asymptomatic cases since the start of the pandemic.

Countries have used different methodologies to identify and count coronavirus deaths, however, making comparisons difficult.

India, with a comparable population to China’s 1.4 billion, officially reported 520,000 Covid deaths after a devastating outbreak swept the country last year — though a forthcoming World Health Organization study reportedly puts the actual toll at four million.

Paul Tambyah, president of the Asia Pacific Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection, said some countries with high tolls such as Britain have regularly recorded anyone who dies within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test as a Covid death.

A WHO spokesperson said the organisation had held “extensive consultations with all countries” on death data, without commenting specifically on China.

– What do the numbers show? –

One explanation for the low toll is that China may be “very strict about classification of Covid-related deaths”, Tambyah told AFP.

China’s health commission told AFP its toll counts virus-infected people who die without first recovering from Covid.

That leaves open the possibility of patients with underlying conditions aggravated by the virus being excluded from the toll if they die of those conditions after meeting the official criteria for Covid recovery.

Another factor could be China’s policy of aggressive mass testing, which may uncover more infections than countries such as India that have faced test shortages.

“The chances of you finding positive but asymptomatic and mild cases are very high,” statistically pushing down the overall death rate, Leong Hoe Nam, an infectious disease specialist at Singapore’s Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital, told AFP.

But even so, “there is always a lag between cases being identified and reported, and people getting sick and dying from this infection,” added Baker.

The fatalities from the Wuhan outbreak at the beginning of the pandemic were later revised upwards by 50 percent by Chinese authorities.

Prabhat Jha, an epidemiology professor at the University of Toronto, said the overall toll from the current outbreak could be “a very large number” due to the large number of under-vaccinated elderly, and vaccines with lower efficacy rates.

– What’s the official explanation? –

Top Chinese epidemiologist Wu Zunyou has attributed the country’s low death rate to its strategy of early detection through mass testing.

“Keeping the scale of the outbreak to a minimum will completely avoid deaths caused by a squeeze on medical resources,” Wu said.

Beijing has also seized on the low death toll as an endorsement of its strict Covid policies, claiming to have placed human life above freedoms, unlike Western democracies that have suffered heavier tolls.

Mai He, a pathology expert at Washington University, said the data was “very much politically affected”.

– What about excess deaths? –

“Our best measure of undercounting Covid comes from comparing reported Covid deaths to excess mortality,” Ariel Karlinsky, from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a technical adviser to the WHO, told AFP.

That would mean comparing deaths attributed to all causes during the pandemic with numbers from non-pandemic years.

Karlinsky said China has been “skittish” about this number, with more detailed data shared only with “select researchers”.

Jha said previous estimates from China published in the international BMJ medical journal showed excess short-term deaths in Wuhan but not in the rest of China, which tallies with the official narrative of deaths.

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Uyghur ‘genocide’: U.S. & China diplomats square off on Twitter

Uyghur 'genocide': U.S. & China diplomats square off on Twitter

Uyghur ‘genocide’: U.S. & China diplomats square off on Twitter

Published on Apr 24, 2022 09:11 AM IST

U.S Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield sparked a social media spat with her Chinese counterpart after she called on the head of the UN Human Rights Council to release an overdue report on rights abuses in China’s Xinjiang region. She also said that any visit of Michelle Bachelet, the UN high commissioner for human rights must have unhindered & unfettered access. In response, the Chinese mission to the UN spokesperson tweeted that, “China welcomes the visit by @mbachele including a trip to Xinjiang. This is a normal exchange between two sides. There is no place for political manipulation and malicious pressure. Such indiscreet remarks only reveal the US intention to set up obstacles to disrupt the visit.” Watch this video to know more.

Joe Biden: China’s Xi Jinping ‘doesn’t have a democratic bone in his body’

The US president told guests that Mr Xi had called him after he won the presidential election in 2020, according to a White House synopsis of the interaction. He said that he told Mr Xi during their three-hour conversation that “the US is the only country organised on an idea”.

Joe Biden: China’s Xi Jinping ‘doesn’t have a democratic bone in his body’

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US president Joe Biden criticised his Chinese counterpart during a fundraising event in Seattle on Thursday, saying Xi Jinping “doesn’t have a democratic bone in his body”.

The US president told guests that Mr Xi had called him after he won the presidential election in 2020, according to a White House synopsis of the interaction. He said that he told Mr Xi during their three-hour conversation that “the US is the only country organised on an idea”.

“I think in the year 2020 and beyond, we’re in the battle between democracies and autocracies,” he said. “Xi Jinping doesn’t have a democratic bone in his body.”

Mr Biden added that he pointed out to Mr Xi during their call that he wouldn’t stop being critical of human rights issues.

Last year too, the president had attacked Mr Xi with a similar statement.

The president said he was familiar with the Chinese leader from his days as vice president under Barack Obama. “He doesn’t have a democratic – with a small ‘d’ – bone in his body, but he’s a smart, smart guy,” Mr Biden said, comparing Mr Xi to Russian president Vladimir Putin.

“He’s one of the guys like [Russian President Vladimir] Putin, who thinks that autocracy is the wave of the future [and that] democracy can’t function in an ever complex world,” he had said.

The president also predicted on Thursday that his fellow Democrats could win two more US Senate seats in November midterms, Reuters reported.

“I’m determined to make sure we keep the House and the Senate,” Biden told the guests

The president was scheduled to spend Thursday night and Friday in Seattle, where he will also observe Earth Day.

China’s yuan is set for its worst weekly drop against the dollar since 2015, as investors rush back to the US

China's yuan was on track for its worst weekly drop since 2015 on Friday, as investors rushed back to the US. The offshore yuan, or renminbi, had fallen 2.4% over the week to 6.53 per dollar, according to Bloomberg data.

China’s yuan is set for its worst weekly drop against the dollar since 2015, as investors rush back to the US

 
·3 min read
 
 
China renminbi yuan
 
China’s currency has fallen sharply this week.Future Publishing/Getty Images
  • China’s yuan was on track for its worst weekly drop since 2015 on Friday, as investors rushed back to the US.

  • The offshore yuan, or renminbi, had fallen 2.4% over the week to 6.53 per dollar, according to Bloomberg data.

  • Rising US bond yields and worries about China’s economy have caused investors to sell the country’s securities.

China’s currency, the yuan, was on track for its worst weekly drop since 2015 on Friday, with investors nervous about the economy and with Federal Reserve policy making Chinese bonds look less attractive.

The offshore yuan, also called the renminbi, traded at around 6.53 per dollar Friday, according to Bloomberg prices.

It had fallen roughly 2.4% since opening at around 6.38 a dollar on Monday. That put it on track for the worst weekly fall since early August 2015, when the government surprised markets by devaluing the currency.

The yuan has taken a pummeling as the US Federal Reserve has prepared to rapidly raise interest rates in response to red-hot inflation. US bond yields have rocketed as investors have demanded a higher return on their investments to reflect the rise in interest rates.

The pick-up in US yields has in turn made Chinese securities look relatively less attractive, driving investors to sell the yuan. The dollar index, which measures the greenback against a basket of currencies, has risen roughly 2.7% over the last month to 100.93.

“In China, the yuan sell-off is threatening to become somewhat of a rout,” said Jeffrey Halley, senior Asia market analyst at currency firm Oanda. “The price action this week suggests that foreign money leaving the China equity and bond markets is in danger of becoming a flood.”

China’s economy is also a concern, analysts said. The government’s strict zero-COVID policy has led to lockdowns in cities such as Shanghai, and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has further clouded the outlook.

The International Monetary Fund downgraded its economic growth forecast for China to 4.4% this year, having expected growth of 4.8% in January. It cut its US growth forecast by 0.3 percentage points to 3.7%.

China’s yuan, or renminbi, is closely controlled by the country’s central bank. The People’s Bank of China sets a point each day for the onshore yuan — that is, the currency traded within the country — and allows it to move 2% in either direction. The offshore yuan is influenced by the onshore currency, but is free-floating.

The PBOC on Wednesday set a lower-than-expected fixing for the onshore yuan, a move which analysts said could boost Chinese imports by making them cheaper in relative terms.

Craig Botham, chief China economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said he expects the currency to weaken further as growth slows in the second quarter.

“We expect the renminbi to hit 6.8 to the dollar by year-end, with risks chiefly to the downside,” he said.

Read more: Stagflation risk is soaring, according to 3 top strategists at a $950 billion asset manager. They explain why some stocks are still attractive — and share 4 ways to prepare a portfolio for the looming combination of high inflation and sluggish growth

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